Enrique Mustelier

* 1982  

  • “Every day there are more disgruntled people, whom I even know, two former members of the Armed Forces here, and they speak worse than you and me, and they are retired, but they speak worse than me, because they know more things. They know how everything works. They have already retired and cannot steal or get what they got, they no longer have the privileges, because they are no longer part of the Armed Forces. So now that they do, not having the benefits, they have to live as an ordinary Cuban in the day by day, eating bugs, just like everyone else. Then they realize the reality. The time comes to wake up. Today’s Cuba is already a Cuba that is being illuminated by many factors. It is waking up.”

  • “First, let me tell you that the opposition in Guantánamo, because I also had the opportunity to do some opposition in Havana… Let me tell you that the opposition in Guantánamo is somewhat more difficult than in any other province, for the mere fact of being so only 23 kilometers from here, thus from where I am sitting at this moment, from the North American Naval Base. It is something that they at all costs try to prevent something from happening here in Guantánamo. Here the Political Police do not live, but neither do they let the opponents live.”

  • “A Council is made up of several people. It can be six, when it is a more or less fair Council. But in these cases of paramilitaries, it is a Council that has up to 20 members. They are prisoners who in exchange for a little more food, in exchange for conjugal visits with their wife, in exchange for extra visits, in exchange for cigarettes or pills, even drugs, that they let them traffic, they let them do all that stuff… So in exchange of that, the Security asks them to repress above all the opponents. That is their job. Suppress opponents. That is the job of a paramilitary council.”

  • “Firstly, the total disagreement with the tyrannical regime existing on the island of Cuba, implanted in the year 1959. A model that does not work. A terrorist model, I would say. It does not work. It doesn't give its citizens opportunities, nothing. I already had a lot of problems, throughout my life I had had a lot of problems with many communist people. I had expressed myself openly, I had said what I thought, and a person who already has that way established, has practically all the doors closed in this country.”

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    Cuba, 20.07.2020

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“The Guantánamo prison is another universe; it is like living in a spaceship.”

Enrique Mustelier Sosa was born on December 29, 1982, in Guantánamo. His father was sentenced to 16 years of deprivation of liberty for his attempt to extract plans of the defensive system of the eastern region of Cuba to the US naval base. As a young man, Enrique was self-employed, although he did not have an official license. Because of his opinions against the communist regime, Enrique was threatened with prison. During Christmas in 2010, he tried to flee Cuba through the Guantánamo Naval Base. On December 24, 2010, he was captured, and a few days later, on December 31, 2010, he was admitted to the Guantanamo Provincial Prison, where he spent the next five years. In 2015, after his release, he resumed his oppositional activities. In addition, he continues to investigate the reasons why his father was allowed to “escapee” in April 2013. He has a strong suspicion that his father was murdered in prison.